Do I Need A New Estate Plan If I Move to a New State?

If I had to pick one question that I am asked the most, I’d have to say this one ranks way up there…

Do I need a new estate plan if I move out of Texas?

Just like the answer to most estate planning questions, the answer is “it depends.” However, this one has a pretty simple explanation.

All estate plans should include these basic documents; a will, a healthcare directive, a financial power of attorney, and guardian nominations if you have minor children. These documents can be state specific and should be reviewed by an attorney in your new state, o be sure they fit that state’s requirements.

However…

Many estate plans also include a trust. A trust is a legal document that allows a third party (called a trustee) to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary. Trusts can be set up in many ways and allow you to specify exactly how and when your assets pass to your beneficiaries.

If you have a trust, it is a contract and, as such, is valid in any state. This means that if you change your state of residence, it does not necessarily need to be updated simply because you moved to another state.

However… (Yes, another one!)

Some states have a state-specific estate tax. If your new state of residence has an estate tax, you may need to plan for it, depending on your net worth.

Our state does not have an estate tax. Therefore, there is no need for us to consider this as we plan for you.

If you move from Texas, you will need to check with an estate planning attorney in your new state of residence to determine if your trust needs to be updated.  If you need a referral to an estate planning attorney near you to get the process started, please contact us at (214) 292-4225.

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Written by Miller Law Office

Miller Law Office

The Miller Law Office is here to help you build and protect your legacy. Rather than having a traditional estate planning practice, which is focused on transactions (such as the drawing up of wills and other documents), we have a more relational focus – having on-going contact with clients over the long-term, helping clients to protect themselves and their families.